12

15 Questions to Put the “Thanks” in Thanksgiving

15 Questions to put the THANKS in ThanksgivingHave you ever tried to stir up some “what we are thankful for” discussion at Thanksgiving dinner, only to be met with blank faces? Or the spouting of obligatory mini-lists such as: “I’m thankful for my spouse. And my children.” Which are not bad things to express thankfulness for – especially if the spouse and children are present – but it doesn’t inspire further conversational contributions. If you’re looking for friends and family to go a little deeper – to evoke a memory of person or place each is grateful for – lose the generic (and somewhat tired) request. To get the gratitude flowing along with the feast, get specific. You can toss out topics or pass around a bowl containing slips of paper with topics for dinner attendees to draw from. Here are 15 questions to help put the “thanks” into your Thanksgiving dinner conversation.

  1. What school subject are you glad you took?
  2. What kind act was shown to you that you are thankful for?
  3. What book are you grateful you read? Why?
  4. What movie or TV show was meaningful to you? In what way?
  5. What is something in the kitchen that you take for granted but really appreciate?
  6. What color are you grateful exists?
  7. What season of the year do you most appreciate? Why?
  8. What person whom you never met (living or dead) are you thankful existed?
  9. What fictional character are you grateful you learned about? Why?
  10. What teacher are you most thankful for? Why?
  11. What local business do you really appreciate?
  12. What life-lesson are you grateful you learned?
  13. What place are you thankful you got to visit or experience?
  14. What job does somebody do that often goes unnoticed but you are grateful it gets done?
  15. What negative experience turned out to have long-term positive benefits that you appreciate?

It may seem like the word “favorite” could be substituted for some of the “thankfuls” and “gratefuls” – but that might be a different discussion. For instance, my favorite teacher – the one who made class so enjoyable – is not the teacher I’m most grateful for. While I certainly appreciated the fun teacher, the one I have gratitude for is the one that saw something in me and required me to improve and grow. Asking specific questions can generate meaningful conversation that puts a spotlight on the “thanks” in  Thanksgiving.

For more Thanksgiving Table Talk ideas, click HERE.

Shel Harrington
 

Click Here to Leave a Comment Below 12 comments